JT SAFETY STANDARDS

ALL of our helmets carry the BSI Kite mark

BSI monitor and test throughout the whole production process so as to ‘independently’ ensure that safety is never compromised and standards are maintained.

BEWARE: The BSI kite mark is normally required on any helmet used in any sort of competitive riding irrespective of the level. So as to comply with safety standards any helmet involved in an impact should be replaced.

STANDARDS:

A technical committee, made up of industry and medical experts are involved in preparing and reviewing periodically the validity of standards. At Just Togs, we comply with British Standards that are managed by the British Standards Institute (B.S.I.). The BSI Kitemark is normally required on any helmet used in any sort of competitive riding irrespective of the level.

EN 1384:

This is the normal riding hat and jockey skull standard as accepted throughout the whole of the European Community. No chin cups are allowed.

PAS 015:

This is generally accepted as covering a greater number of criteria or similar criteria at a higher standard, than that applied by the European standard (EN: 1384). PAS 015 includes a stability test to limit excessive movement during wear or a fall. Most British Organisations look for this level of protection. Helmets are put under vigorous testing on shock absorption, durability of clip/fastenings, deflection of peak and penetration resistance.

No riding helmet will completely prevent an injury. In extreme circumstances even if wearing a helmet a head injury could occur. Helmets are designed to minimise injury wherever possible.

You need to choose a hat that carries one of the following safety standards;
Other hats offering a high level of protection are:

  • The ASTMF 1163-95
  • ASTM Snell E95 (SEI)
  • Australian/New Zealand SNZ 3838 1998

So as to comply with safety standards any helmet involved in an impact should be replaced. Even if the helmet was not involved in a rider falling off but was dropped onto a hard surface it should be replaced.

LEGAL REQUIREMENTS

It is a legal requirement that children aged 14 years or younger must wear a riding hat to at least BS4472 when riding on the road. This law was passed when the official BSI hat Standard was BS 4472. It is anticipated that the law will be changed to the current BS Standard. It is now recommended that a minimum of BS1384 is worn.

Did you know...

When you have a fall, a certified helmet absorbs energy by crushing and extending your heads stopping time. This reduces the peak impact on the brain significantly.

Riding helmets are built to compress and fracture on serious impact. So, a broken helmet is not a sign of a faulty one - in fact, they may crush or crack as they absorb the energy that could otherwise cause you serious injury.

Most injuries occur from unpredictable riding events, such as... a horse spooking, bucking, or bolting, but 20% happen during non-riding activities or as a bystander. Wear your helmet when around horses even if you are not mounted.

Your level of expertise doesn’t protect you: The risk of injury is tied to cumulative riding time, not level of expertise.

The risk of injury is more closely tied to your distance above the ground, rather than your speed, a fall from above only 2 feet high can cause serious damage.

You need to replace your helmet if you’re ever in a fall. It could have a defect that’s invisible, and if you fall on that same part of the helmet again, you won’t have the protection that you need.

Even if your helmet never takes a hit, it’s a good idea to replace it at least every five years (or sooner if you ride often), just because the helmet material can take a beating from all the sweat, heat, dust, and rain.

Horse riders have the same number of injury accidents per riding hour as motorcycle riders.